Autumn comes to Matsue Castle in Shimane Prefecture.
©JNTO
JNTO JNTO MICE

Newsletter

November 2010   

HOT TOPICS

On October 31st, Haneda Airport was officially opened to international flight service!

The Yosakoi Festival is a dance event that started in 1954 in Kochi Prefecture, and is now held throughout Japan. In particular, the Yosakoi Sasebo Festival, which is held annually at the end of the month of October in Sasebo, Nagasaki Prefecture, has become Kyushu's largest festival. Enthusiastic dancers from all over Japan gather to present amazing performances in various parts of town.
©JNTO

News Update Special – Haneda Airport

Haneda's new green-technology dedicated international terminal delivers.

Supplier Corner

Tired of researching MICE sites? Find your next meetings and incentive location with a special collection of links to Tokyo and Kanagawa area MICE cites that will get you off the bench and into the MICE game by handing you all the core information and contact details that will get you into RFP mode.

Tokyo's Unique Venues, Attractions and Places of Interest

 
News Update Special
 
 

A New Era of Meetings and Incentive Convenience Begins in Japan with
the Internationalization of Haneda (Tokyo International) Airport

On October 31st, 2010, Haneda (Tokyo International) Airport opened up its newly constructed runway "D, " which began operations ten days prior on October 21st, to international traffic from Asia, North America, and Europe, marking its official transition from its previous position as Japan's primary domestic airport.

 

Located directly within the jurisdiction of greater Tokyo, Haneda provides unparalleled proximity to the Tokyo and Yokohama areas. With such proximity coupled with the opening of a brand new international terminal with direct access to the Tokyo Monorail and Keikyu lines, as well as convenient transfer access to domestic flights, the newly improved Haneda Airport provides significantly improved time and cost effective access to sites in Tokyo and Japan as a whole. With the internationalization of Haneda Airport, a new era of travel, business, meetings and incentive convenience has arrived in Japan.

The All New Haneda Airport: In the Sky

The changes at Haneda start in the sky. As of October 31st, 2010, Haneda Airport, which had formerly dealt exclusively with domestic and eastern Asia flights only, has opened up service to North America, Europe and Southeast Asia. Six cities in North America will be connected directly to Haneda: Detroit, Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, Vancouver, Honolulu.

Airport Airlines Starting Operation
DetroitDelta Air LinesFebruary 2011
Los AngelesAll Nippon AirwaysOctober 31, 2010
Delta Air LinesFebruary 2011
San FranciscoJapan AirlinesOctober 31, 2010
New York (JFK)American AirlinesFebruary 2011
VancouverAir CanadaJanuary 31, 2010
HonoluluAll Nippon AirwaysOctober 31, 2010
Japan AirlinesOctober 31, 2010
Hawaiian AirlinesNovember 19, 2010

Bird's eye view of the new International Terminal.

©Japan Airport Terminal Co., Ltd. All rights reserved.
The All New Haneda Airport: On the Ground

There are three main parts to the improvements completed recently at Haneda: the construction of a new runway, "D, " on landfill in Tokyo Bay to handle increased traffic, the expansion and update of the eastern wing of Terminal 2, and the construction of a completely new five-story international terminal with direct access to the Tokyo Monorail and Keikyu lines. The new International Terminal Station of the Tokyo Monorail and Keikyu lines, located on the 3rd and underground floor of the new International terminal respectively, began operation on October 21st in line with the opening of the new international terminal and runway "D, " providing direct access to the Tokyo's railway network. The Tokyo Monorail and Keikyu lines are free for those transferring between the new International terminal to the domestic terminals 1 and 2 and vice versa. These three terminals are also connected by a free shuttle bus. Tokyo Monorail runs every 3 to 5 minutes. The monorail's city station is Hamamatsu-cho, one of the stops on Tokyo's main train loop, the Yamanote Line. The Keikyu line runs every 5 to 10 minutes to Shinagawa, which is also a stop on the Yamanote Line. Transfers to the bullet train can be made at Shinagawa.

Other than the two new stations in the new international terminal at Haneda, new improvements have been added to both the existing Keikyu and Tokyo Monorail lines. For the ease of international passengers utilizing the Keikyu Line, a new station numbering system was introduced during October. On the Tokyo Monorail end, a new travel center with personnel dealing in English, Korean and Chinese was established in the new Tokyo Monorail station where help in regards to transportation within the Tokyo area can be received. Furthermore, to celebrate and welcome the internationalization of Haneda and visitors from overseas, a newly redesigned Tokyo Monorail Pokémon Monorail began running on October 21st. The new train exclaims "Welcome! " to visitors in English, Korean and Japanese on the outside, and the inside has also been refitted to be multilingual. Service improvements at Haneda are not limited to the rail. Direct-to-hotel Limousine Bus service stops have been increased throughout Tokyo in areas such as Roppongi and Shiodome. The late night Limousine Bus to Shinjuku and Ikebukuro has been made regular. This will likely come in handy for individuals arriving from the new international lines, many of whom will be arriving during the late night/early morning time period.

Edo Alley

©Japan Airport Terminal Co., Ltd. All rights reserved.
The new international terminal's third floor departure lobby sports a tall dome roof, creating a liberating atmosphere that one would expect from an international airport. The new international terminal operates 24 hours, and is outfitted with a 24 hour food court as well as airport lounges equipped with passenger-use showers and couches complete with footrests for comfortable napping. The 4th and 5th floors of the new international terminal are called the "E·Do Marketplace. " Inside the "E·Do Marketplace " is "Edo Alley, " a food and sales area modeled after old Tokyo, the world's first planetarium café and an observation deck providing a 270 degree view. 18 shops are open in the "Edo Alley " area. Tea and Japanese treat store "Kyo-Hayashiya, " and ramen restaurant "Setagaya " are among famous tenants lined up. In the middle of "Edo Alley " stands "Edo Stage " to be used for various live events. Works of art by famous artist Hiroshi Senju decorate 18 spots in the area. There is no passport requirement to go into the "E·Do Marketplace" which is currently on its way to becoming a tourist destination in itself.

Haneda's passenger restricted area also hosts 4 brand new lounges. Two are reserved for Japan Airlines (JAL) and All Nippon Airways (ANA) respectively while the remaining two are in turn reserved for various airline customers and high level credit card holders respectively. Finally, the foreign tourist information center, formerly in terminal 1 has been relocated to the new international terminal. The information center provides Chinese (Mandarin), Korean and English assistance.

The All New Haneda Airport: Eco-friendly Infrastructure

The recent and ongoing renovations on terminal buildings one, two and the construction of the new international terminal were not just aimed at improved transportation service, but also at the creation of an "Eco Airport. " The new Haneda Airport now has in place a large range of measures in place to minimize environmental impact in terms of atmospheric pollution, noise, vibrations, water, soil, waste matter and energy, and to limit carbon dioxide emissions to the lowest possible level. Firstly, terminals 1 and 2 are currently in the process of being retrofitted with massive solar panel systems to match that in place at the recently completed international terminal. Secondly, The new international terminal utilizes geothermal heat soaked up by the massive underground piles in place to secure the terminal. Heat pumps in the new terminal use a natural refrigerant to harness that warmth from the piles and use it to heat and cool the terminal. Thirdly, the new international terminal is the first airport in the world to put to use NAS (sodium-sulfur) batteries, which charge up at night when the price of electricity is cheap due to low demand and kick in during the afternoon when the local power grid is under stress, thus saving the environment while also saving time, energy, money, and protecting the local power grid from midday brownouts. Finally, the new terminal utilizes gas cogeneration to make the most out of purchased energy. The eco-friendly Haneda is sure to be a hit with the MICE community which also seeks to lower its impact on the environment.

Private Business Jets and Charter Flights Get Expanded Access to Haneda

With the opening of the new international terminal and runway "D, " restrictions on foreign business jets at Haneda have been relaxed. In line with Haneda's new increased capacity, the previous overall restriction against foreign business jets during the 6am to 11pm time period has been abolished. Furthermore, the total number of business jets (domestic and international) allowed to take off and land during this period has been doubled. The number of days a business jet is allowed to stay on the ground at the airport has been extended by two to seven days, and the previous requirement for foreign business jets to register seven days before hand if planning to landing during the late night time frame has also been done away with.



The All New Haneda Experience Equals
the All New Meetings and Incentive Experience

So what does the opening of Haneda Airport mean for those considering Japan as a Meetings and Incentive destination?

It means getting where you need to go has never been easier. Particularly for those looking to hold events at MICE sites in Greater Tokyo (Tokyo-to) or Kanagawa Prefecture (Kanagawa-ken), the internationalization of Haneda and corresponding transportation infrastructure and service improvements means speed, convenience and lower costs. It's never been such a good time to get down to business in Japan!

In the following Supplier Corner section, we reintroduce a famous group of Tokyo MICE sites, which have become even more appealing go-to destinations in light of the beginning of international service to and from Haneda to Europe, Southeast Asia and the Americas.

 
Supplier Corner
 

New International Service at Haneda Airport Means unparalleled Access to Hotels and Meeting Facilities in the Tokyo and Yokohama Vicinity

Haneda’s opening up to more international routes will enable visitors to access central Tokyo easily. Tokyo is home to both luxury international and Japanese brand hotels, both of which pride themselves on their world-class facilities and Japanese hospitality. However, top class hospitality is not something limited to the most expensive accommodations. Throughout Tokyo, those planning a meeting on a budget can expect the same great service no matter what hotel they choose.

The below maps show the Akasaka/Roppongi and Marunouchi/Imperial Palace areas, which are two major downtown district where good number of hotels and conference centers are located.

Akasaka/Roppongi Map: http://tcvb.or.jp/en/arearoute/area/roppongi.html
Marunouchi/Imperial Palace Map: http://tcvb.or.jp/en/arearoute/area/marunouchi.html
Shinjuku Map: http://www.jnto.go.jp/eng/map/003_Shinjuku.html

 

Akasaka/Roppongi Map ©TCVB

 

Marunouchi/Imperial Palace Map ©TCVB

 

Shinjuku Map ©TCVB

Late October saw the exciting opening of luxury hotel, The Capitol Tokyu Hotel, in Akasaka. Akasaka is located right in the heart of downtown Tokyo. The newly reconstructed hotel has 251 rooms available, including 13 luxury suites, as well as top notch meeting and banquet facilities and services. You can find out about the hotel's details in our May newsletter.

In the same area as The Capitol Tokyu, is the New Otani Hotel. The New Otani Hotel boasts an expansive Japanese garden and 32 meeting rooms which can accommodate any size of meeting. Lucky for you, The New Otani Hotel Tokyo is currently offering a special meeting package! To find more about it, You can find out about the hotel's details in our May newsletter.

In the area next to Akasaka called Roppongi, the ANA InterContinental Hotel Tokyo also has a meeting package. The chain has put the meeting industry as one of their top business priorities for the upcoming year, and you can learn more about their strategy in our May newsletter as well.

The Akasaka/Roppongi area is a lively international district known as a stimulating center for business, culture, fashion and leisure. It is located conveniently close to the famous Ginza shopping district and Kasumigaseki government district. Meanwhile, the Marunouchi/Imperial Palace area is also another area which can be perfect for both business and after business. Situated between Tokyo Station and the Imperial Palace, Japan's most prestigious business district of Marunouchi, in combination with neighboring Otemachi, is home to the headquarters of the Tokyo branches of many of Japan's and global financial companies. With the Imperial Palace as a backdrop, this area is full of green. A number of newly opened shopping and dining complexes around Tokyo Station make the area more attractive than ever before. The Imperial Hotel Tokyo, which celebrates its 120-year anniversary, has a long history as a host of meetings and incentive events. A few blocks away, there is The Peninsula Tokyo which offers meeting packages as well. For detailed information on the meetings and incentive deals offered by these venues,see our May newsletter.

Shinagawa district, only a few minutes from Haneda Airport, is home to the Prince Hotel chain, which also has excellent meetings and incentive offerings. Shinagawa Station is a key bullet train and Tokyo transportation hub. Transit to Japan's local cities could not be easier than at Shinagawa.

Yokohama, which is hosting the 18th APEC Economic Leader's Meeting and 22nd APEC Ministerial Meeting, is a great meetings and incentive city just outside of Tokyo, located to the south of Haneda Airport and with the same great access from Haneda. Yokohama is located on the waterfront looking over Mt. Fuji. Yokohama is a sophisticated city and historically international city with an atmosphere of its own. The Pacifico Yokohama and hotels such as the InterContinental Yokohama Grand mean Yokohama can accommodate anything from massive conferences with over 10,000 attendees to a board meeting in a luxury hotel. For more information, once again, visit our May newsletter.

The bottom line is that new international service at Haneda Airport means unparalleled access to key Tokyo and Yokohama MICE destinations. This time in Supplier Corner, we wrap up with links to key MICE destinations in these two areas. All of the various unique venues introduced in the following ICC Community section can be easily reached by any of these MICE sites.

ANA InterContinental Hotel Tokyo

©ANA InterContinental Tokyo, All right reserved.

ANA InterContinental Hotel Tokyo
Webpage Specific to MICE:
http://www.anaintercontinental-tokyo.jp/e/banquet/
Site Location: http://www.anaintercontinental-tokyo.jp/e/access/
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link:
http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information:
http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/intercontinental/en/gb/reservations/dates-preferences/tokyo-anaintercontinental
1-12-33 Akasaka, Mintao-Ku, Tokyo, Japan 107-0052
Tel: 81-3-35051111 / 1-888-424-6835
Fax: 81-3-35051155

Hilton Tokyo

©Hilton

Hilton Tokyo
Webpage Specific to MICE:
http://www.hilton.com/en/hi/hotels/groups.jhtml?ctyhocn=TYOHITW
Site Location:
http://www1.hilton.com/en_US/hi/hotel/TYOHITW-Hilton-Tokyo-hotel/directions.do
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link: http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information:
6-2 Nishi-Shinjuku 6-chome, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo, Japan 160-0023
Tel: 81-3-3344-5111
Fax: 81-3-3342-6094

Hotel Okura

 

Hotel Okura
Webpage Specific to MICE:
http://www.okura.com/tokyo/banquet/index.html
Site Location: http://www.okura.com/tokyo/info/trans.html
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link:
http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information:http://www.okura.com/tokyo/inquiry.html
- Japan Office -
2-10-4 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan 105-0001
Tel: 81-3-3582-0111
Fax: 81-3-3582-3707
- United States Office -
11101 West 120th Avenue, Suite 230, Broomfield,
Colorado, 80021-3436 U.S.A.
Tel: 1-303-404-2137
Fax: 1-303-404-2146

Keio Plaza Hotel

 

Keio Plaza Hotel
Webpage Specific to MICE:
http://www.keioplaza.com/banquet/index.html
Site Location: http://www.keioplaza.com/map/
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link: http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information:
- Japan Office -
Keio Plaza Hotel Tokyo
2-2-1 Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo, Japan 160-8330
Tel: 81-3-3344-0111
Fax: 81-3-3345-8269
- United States Office -
617 South Olive Street, Suite 1215, Los Angeles, CA90014, U.S.A.
Tel: 1-213-362-7767
Fax: 1-213-362-7772

Shinagawa Prince Hotel


Shinagawa Prince Hotel
Webpage Specific to MICE:
http://www.princehotels.com/en/tokyo-mice-city/
Site Location:
http://www.princehotels.com/en/tokyo-mice-city/access/index.html
http://www.princehotels.com/en/shinagawa/access/
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link: http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information:https://www5.princehotels.co.jp/cgi/form/ptmc-e/
10-30 Takanawa 4-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan 108-8611
Tel: 81-03-3440-1111

The Capitol Hotel Tokyu

©Tokyu Hotels Co., LTD

The Capitol Hotel Tokyu
Webpage Specific to MICE:
http://www.capitolhoteltokyu.com/en/#/meeting/
Site Location: http://www.capitolhoteltokyu.com/en/#/access/
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link:
http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information:
http://www.capitolhoteltokyu.com/en/#/test_contactus/
- Japan Office -
Tokyu Hotels Co., Ltd, The Capitol Hotel Tokyu
Shin-Nanpeidai Tokyu Bldg, 1-21-2,
Dogenzaka, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, Japan 150-0043 Tel: 81-3-3503-0109
Fax: 81-3-3503-0309
- United States Office -
233 Broadway, Suite 860,
New York, NY 10279
Tel: 212-490-0456 / 1-800-42-TOKYU (86598)
Fax: 212-490-0426

The Grand Hyatt Tokyo

©Hyatt

The Grand Hyatt Tokyo
Webpage Specific to MICE:
http://www.tokyo.grand.hyatt.com/hyatt/hotels/events/index.jsp
Site Location: http://www.tokyo.grand.hyatt.com/hyatt/hotels/services/maps/index
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link: http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information: https://rfp.hyattmeetings.com/frontend/searchsite/
6-10-3 Roppongi, Minato-Ku, Tokyo, Japan 106-0032
Tel: 81-3-4333-1234
Fax: 81-3-4333-8123
Email: tokyo.grand@hyatt.com

The Imperial Hotel

©Imperial Hotel
 

The Imperial Hotel
Webpage Specific to MICE:
http://www.imperialhotel.co.jp/e/tokyo/facility/457
Site Location: http://www.imperialhotel.co.jp/e/tokyo/page/497
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link:
http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information: http://www.imperialhotel.co.jp/e/top/page/464
- Japan Office -
1-1, Uchisaiwai-Cho 1-chome, Chiyoda-ku,
Tokyo, Japan 100-8558,
Tel: 81-3-3504-1111 / (Reservation) 81-3-3504-1251
Fax: 81-3-3581-9146 / (Reservation) 81-3-3504-1258
- United States Office -
1212 Avenue of the Americas,
19th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10036, U.S.A
Tel: 1-212-692-9001
Fax: 1-212-867-4470

The New Otani

 

Hotel New Otani
Webpage Specific to MICE:
http://www.newotani.co.jp/en/tokyo/banquet/plan/conference/index.html
Site Location: http://www.newotani.co.jp/en/tokyo/info/access/index.html
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link:
http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information:
http://www.newotani.co.jp/en/group/sales_reservation/index.html
- Japan Office -
4-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan 102-8578
Tel: 81-3-3265-1111
- United States Office -
260 Madison Avenue 8th Floor,
New York, New York 10016 U.S.A
Tel: 1-646-216-2186 / 1-800-591-7484
Fax: 1-646-216-2188

Tokyo International Forum

 

Tokyo International Forum
Webpage Specific to MICE: http://www.t-i-forum.co.jp/general/index.php
Site Location: http://www.t-i-forum.co.jp/english/access.html
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link:
http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information:
3-5-1 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan 100-0005
Tel: 81-3-5221-9000
Fax: 81-3-5221-9011
Email: reserve@t-i-forum.co.jp

Pacifico Yokohama

©JNTO

Pacifico Yokohama
Webpage Specific to MICE:
http://www.pacifico.co.jp/english/facility/index.html
Site Location: http://www.pacifico.co.jp/english/facility/accessmap.html
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link:
http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information:
http://www.pacifico.co.jp/english/contactus/index.html
1-1-1 Minato Mirai, Nishi-ku,
Yokohama, Japan, 220-0012
Tel: 81-45-221-2166 (Transportation Guide) /
81-45-221-2155 (Information)

The Intercontinental Yokohama Grand

©IHG




The InterContinenal Yokohama Grand (Part of Pacifico Yokohama)
Webpage Specific to MICE:
http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/intercontinental/en/gb/locations/hotel-features/event-facilities/overview/yokohama
Site Location:
http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/intercontinental/en/gb/locations/maps-directions/yokohama
May 2010 JNTO MICE Article Link: http://www.japantravelinfo.com/newsletter/mice/2010_05/
Contact Information: http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/intercontinental/en/gb/locations/hotel-features/event-facilities/overview/yokohama
1-1-1 Minatomirai, Nishi-Ku, Yokohama,
Japan, 220-8522 Tel: 81-45-223-2288 / 1-888-424-6835
Fax: 81-45-221-0650
Email: sales@icyokohama.com


Please submit your request for proposal (FRP) either directly to the above facilities utilizing the submission process on their corresponding meetings and incentives pages, or utilize a RFP submission client like that provided by Cvent. If you need any help getting in contact with any of your desired Japan meetings and incentive sites, or have been unable to receive a satisfactory response, please feel free to contact the JNTO for assistance!

 
ICC Focus –Tokyo's Unique Venues, Attractions and Places of Interest
 

For this month’s International Convention City focus, we look at the Tokyo’s Unique Venues, Attractions and Places of Interest.

You've gotten to your MICE destination so quickly from Haneda that you have extra time!
Why not use it to explore what Tokyo has to offer?

Many sites and venues in Tokyo offer their guests a unique experience. Options that guests can find nowhere else but Tokyo at places such as Happo-en and Chinzan-so include functions held in the lush greenery of traditional Japanese gardens and temples, parties held on old Edo-style pleasure boats, and receptions held on the highest floor of ultra-modern skyscrapers with the breathtaking Tokyo nightscape as a backdrop. There are also many attractive sites both old and new in Tokyo. Shrines and temples such as Meiji Shrine and Sensoji Temple, Japanese gardens, such as Hama-rikyu, Rikugien and Kiyosumi gardens, Tsukiji fish market and the numerous museums and art gallaries make up only a fraction of the places to see and experience. Perhaps you would like to take a run over to Ginza to experience Kabuki theater or to Shibuya to see Nohgaku. Or, if the day is over, why not visit Odaiba for shopping followed by a visit to Oedo Onsen Monogatari where you can enjoy an Edo period themed natural hot spring bath? If bathing isn't your style, take in the night view at Tokyo Tower in Minato-ku or at the world's largest broadcasting tower, the Tokyo Sky Tree in Sumida ward. One could get a Japanese recipe or two under one's belt by visiting Ecole de Cuisine Egami or Hifumi-an cooking schools in Shinjuku to take a cooking class or take a tour of the Nihon Shuzo Kaikan for individual or group sake tasting. Roppongi Hills and bring the nightlife. Finally if shopping is of the order, Isetan, Mitsukoshi, and Tokyu department stores, in Shinjuku, Nihombashi-muromachi, and Shibuya respectively are best bets. Finally, any of a number of destinations can be reached from Tokyo. Moving outside the bustle of Tokyo to be welcomed by traditional shrines and temples, breathtaking views, lush greenery and relaxing hot springs can be the perfect way to wrap up any MICE event. Daytrip sites to Nikko, Hakone and Kamakura from Tokyo exceed meeting planners' needs for convenience, range of activities and unique experiences. Kamakura is known internationally as a World Heritage site, a premier onsen hot spring town and an ancient capital city home to one of the world's largest open air Buddhas.

The beauty of utilizing Tokyo area convention venues or convention hotels is that no matter which one you pick, there are innumerable attractions and places of interest little more than a 10 to 15 minute bus or subway ride. The meetings and incentive venues and hotels that are being highlighted in this issue in light of the internationalization of Haneda airport are all in Minato Ward, Shibuya Ward, Shinjuku Ward, Shinagawa Ward or Yokohama. All of the venues mentioned above (and listed in detail below) are thus readily within reach and can be easily built into any itinerary.



Happo-en (Venue)
Happo-en is a traditional Japanese garden with a history of nearly 400 years. The garden includes a number of traditionally styled buildings. It is located in the exclusive residential area of Shirokanedai, in close proximity to a number of embassies. The premises comprise 14 versatile banquet halls set amid the lush greenery of the gardens. Inside the main building, the largest hall, Jour, can be configured to welcome up to 800 guests. The Hakuho-kan annex to the rear of the garden houses a 240 sq. meter Japanese tatami banquet hall, the largest of its kind in Tokyo. Popular for weddings, the halls of Happo-en provide a perfect backdrop to any party or function. The gardens are ideal for al fresco cocktails and events where guests can mingle outdoors.

1-1-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8631
Tel: 81-3-3443-3111
Fax: 81-3-3443-3116
Website: http://www.happo-en.com/english/index.html
e-mail: banquet@happo-en.com

Happo-en

©Happo-en

Chinzan-so (Venue)
The Japanese garden restaurant Chinzan-so is situated in a vest 66000 sq. meter landscape known as Camellia Mountain in northeastern Tokyo. Nestled in the same complex as the Four Seasons Hotel, it is easily accessible by bus from Narita and Haneda airports. The 17 banquet halls offer an array of choices for functions. The largest is Orion, where up to 1,500 guests can be entertained under a ceiling glittering with chandeliers. A permanent stage, together with state of the art sound and visual equipment are installed. The outstanding equipment makes this venue ideal for receptions, large-scale parties, and live broadcasting events. Some halls look out over the gardens and others offer magnificent cityscapes. Smaller rooms are tucked away in leafy glades. Various dining options include Japanese, French and buffet style.

2-10-8 Sekiguchi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8680
Tel: +81-3-3943-1111
Fax:+81-3-3943-1190
Website: http://www.chinzanso.com/english/
e-mail: hanbai@chinzanso.com

Chinzan-so

©Chinzan-so Garden
©Chinzan-so Four Seasons Hotel / ©JNTO

Meiji Shrine
Situated in the depths of an evergreen forest, Meiji Shrine generates calm amidst the busy metropolis. Meiji Shrine was built to honor Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken in 1920. The torii gate at the entrance is the largest in Japan. Over 100,000 trees donated by people nationwide grow in the compound. This shrine draws the largest crowds in Japan for the traditional New Year's shrine visit (hatsumode). It is adjacent to JR Harajuku station.

1-1 Kamizono-cho, Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-8557
Website: http://www.meijijingu.or.jp/english/index.html
Hours: (Shrine) Sunrise to sunset daily, (Inner Garden) 9:00-16:00

Meiji Shrine

©JNTO

Sensoji Temple
The magnificent Sensoji Temple is the oldest and most popular temple in Tokyo. The temple was founded in the 7th century to enshrine a tiny golden statue of Kannon, the goddess of mercy. A beautiful five-story pagoda is a prominent landmark within Sensoji. Nakamise street has colorful shops selling traditional crafts and kimono accessories. Omikuji fortune slips are available inside the main temple compound.

2-3-1 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo 111-0032
Website: http://www.senso-ji.jp/
Hours: 6:00-17:00 (Apr.-Sep.), 6:30-17:00 (Oct.-Mar.)

Sensoji Temple

Yasufumi Nishi / ©JNTO

Hama-Rikyu Onshi Gardens
This beautifully designed garden was once the property of the Tokugawa Shogun family who used it for hunting with falcons. It is a typical garden of the Edo period, with a tidal pond and two duck ponds. The former is a unique tidewater pond designed to reflect a landscape that changes with the ebb and flow of the sea. The garden is close to the Ginza district, and guests can enjoy refreshment in a traditional tea house.

1-1 Hama-rikyu-teien, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0046
Website: http://www.tokyo-park.or.jp/english/park/detail_04.html#hamarikyu
Hours: 9:00-17:00, closed on New Year's holiday

Hama-Rikyu Onshi Gardens

©JNTO

Rikugien Gardens
This 18th century aristocrat's private garden is now a public haven of tranquility away from the noise of the city. The garden was built in 1702 by Yanagisawa Yoshiyasu, one of the Shogun's favorites. It was designed to recreate 88 scenes from Japanese poems. Year round, the garden has something to offer the visitor in terms of natural beauty, be it the cherry blossoms in spring or the changing color of the autumn leaves.

6-16-3 Hon-komagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0021
Website: http://www.tokyo-park.or.jp/english/park/detail_08.html#rikugien
Hours: 9:00-17:00, closed on New Year holidays.

Rikugien Gardens

©Tokyo Metropolitan Park Association

Kiyosumi Gardens
Dating back to the Edo period, Kiyosumi Gardens is a place of great scenic beauty, featuring a pond, man-made hills and many rocks and red stones. Once the residence of a wealthy merchant, the garden became to property of Yataro Iwasaki, the founder of Mitsubishi. Iwasaki rebuilt the garden and used it as a place to entertain guests. The pond features three islands, tea houses and a series of stepping stones.

3-3-9 Kiyosumi, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0024
Website: http://www.tokyo-park.or.jp/english/park/detail_04.html#kiyosumi
Hours: 9:00-17:00, closed on New Year holidays.

Kiyosumi Gardens

©Tokyo Metropolitan Park Association

O-Edo Onsen Monogatari (Attraction)
The atmosphere of old Tokyo is recreated at this onsen (natural hot spring bath) in Odaiba, Tokyo's waterfront district. The facility offers open-air, foot, sand and steam baths, tatami rooms, massage salons and Japanese gardens. A yukata (traditional Japanese robe) is provided, with 19 different and original patterns to choose from. Hirokoji Street, with Japanese food stalls and restaurants, is ideal to stroll around in yukata.

2-6-3 Aomi, Koto-ku, Tokyo, 135-0064
Website: http://www.ooedoonsen.jp/higaeri/index.html
Hours: 11:00am - 9:00am (next day) daily

O-Edo Onsen Monogatar

©JNTO

Tokyo Tower (Attraction)
Modeled on the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Tokyo Tower is a television and radio broadcasting tower. The tower's main observatory (150m) offers a 360 degree view of the entire greater Tokyo region, while the special observatory (250m) commands a majestic view of Mt. Fuji. The tower changes its look at night, bathed in orange light in the winter and white light in the summer. Roppongi is within walking distance.

4-2-8 Shiba-koen, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0011
Website: http://www.tokyotower.co.jp/english
Hours: 9:00-22:00

Tokyo Tower

©JNTO

Tokyo Sky Tree (Attraction)
Tokyo Sky Tree, expected to open in Sumida Ward, northeastern Tokyo in the spring of 2012, will be the world tallest broadcasting tower at 634 meters. The structure showcases ancient five-story pagodas, an original color based on traditional Japanese hues and the most modern technologies with a triangular base that gradually becomes cylindrical. The first observatory will feature a restaurant and café, and the second will have a glass passage giving the feel of "floating " in the air.

Website: http://www.tokyo-skytree.jp/english/

Tokyo Sky Tree

©TOBU RAILWAY CO.,LTD. & TOBU TOWER SKY TREE CO.,LTD. ALL Right Reserved.

Japanese Cooking (Attraction/Activity)
Japanese cuisine is known for its five flavors (sweet, salty, sour, bitter and spicy), five colors (white, black, yellow, red and green), and five preparation methods (cutting and slicing of raw food, stewing, baking, grilling, frying and steaming). Visual aesthetics are a vital component and careful attention is paid to the setting and tableware. Use of fresh condiments adds a distinctive aroma to the dishes. Japanese cuisine is justly famed for sushi and sashimi, but other delicious dishes include tempura, sukiyaki and shabu-shabu. Japanese food is not just something to taste or smell. It provides an experience for all of the senses. There are cooking schools in Tokyo where it is possible to try out Japanese cooking methods. Recommended are Ecole de Cuisine Egami and Hifumi-an.

- Ecole de Cuisine Egami :
21 Sanai-cho, Ichigaya, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0846
Tel: 81-3-3269-0281
Fax: 81-3-3269-0285
Email: info@egami-cooking.co.jp

- Hifumi-an:
1F, 102 Yarai-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0805
Tel: 81-3-5228-2272
Fax: 81-3-5228-2272
Email: 123@hifumi-an.com

Hifumi-an

©2007 Hifumi-an

Kabuki (Attraction)
Kabuki means music, dance, and performance, and it is the art of mixing these three elements that has been a traditional form of theater in Japan. Kabuki has always been a popular form of entertainment, taking its themes from historical events (jidaimono), stories from ordinary life (sewamono), and dance performances (shosagoto). Kabuki requires unique stage settings, including the extended stage apron that forms a pathway through the audience known as the hanamichi (flower path). One of the main attractions of kabuki is its use of extravagant make-up and costumes. Kabuki actors are exclusively male. Kabuki was inscribed on the UNESCO list of World Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2005. Kabuki-za Theater in the Ginza district of Tokyo is one of the most famous venues for kabuki. Each performance comprises three to four acts, although one-act tickets are available for those with limited time.
Kabuki-za Theater is being built anew and is due to be completed by 2013. In the meantime performances will be being held at Shinbashi Enbujo.

Kabuki-za Theater:
4-12-15 Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0061
Tel: 81-3-3541-3131
Website: http://www.kabuki-bito.jp/eng/top.html

Kabuki-za Theater

©JNTO

Nohgaku (Attraction)
The traditional performing arts of noh and kyogen, jointly referred to as the art of nohgaku, were developed in the 14th century. They offer completely contrasting styles of performance. Noh is a symbolic dramatic performing act, structured around song and dance and performed with a chorus (kiutai) and instrumentalists (hayashi). Noh uses a very simple stage and the performance relies on a graceful aesthetic effect that is termed yugen (subtle and profound beauty). The use of noh masks enhances this effect. In contrast, kyogen is a spoken drama that relies on word play to create laughter and comedy. Kyogen performances are usually based on the everyday life of the common people in bygone days. Life-size characters, both good and bad, are depicted in a humorous manner that is still capable of entertaining audiences today. Nohgaku was inscribed on the UNESCO list of World Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2001.

National Noh Theatre:
4-18-1 Sendagaya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0051
Tel: 81-3-3423-1331
Website: http://www.ntj.jac.go.jp/english/index.html

National Nohgaku Theatre (Kokuritsu Nohgakudo)

©National Nohgaku Theatre

Nikko (Day Trip)
Nikko is a very popular tourist spot combining natural beauty and history. Located two hours by express train from Asakusa, Nikko is also famous for being a World Heritage Site. The Toshogu Shrine is dedicated to the memory of Ieyasu Tokugawa, the founder of the Edo Shogunate. Elaborate Yomeimon with its decorative sculptures is designated as a national treasure. The dynamic flow of Kegon Falls, beautiful Lake Chuzenji and winding Irohazaka road are additional highlights.

Website: http://www.nikko-jp.org/english/index.html

Nikko - Toshogu

©JNTO

Hakone (Day Trip)
Hakone is a popular mountain hot spring resort with Lake Ashi at its center. A two-hour trip away from Tokyo, is home to 17 hot spring towns. For great views, try to book your seat on the popular Romance Car in the front of the Odakyu line train with a special wide open window set up that gives you a great view of Japan as you go to and from Hakone. On a clear day, Lake Ashi offers a serene view of Mt. Fuji. Large excursion boats take you around the lake with its picturesque scenery of spectacular nature. The Hakone Ropeway offers great views of Mt. Fuji as you ride over the smoldering volcanic Owakudani.

Website: http://www.hakone.or.jp/english/index.html

Hakone Ropeway

©Odakyu Electric Railway / ©JNTO

Kamakura (Day Trip)
Kamakura is an ancient seaside city with famous temples and shrines, amid a pleasant verdant setting. Kamakura is located one and a half hours by bus from central Tokyo. In addition to Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine, many famous temples and shrines are spread around. Kamakura is home to The Great Buddha, one of the largest open-air Buddhas in the world. The Great Buddha is located at Kotokuin Temple.

Website:
http://www.city.kamakura.kanagawa.jp/english/index.html

Kamakura – The Great Buddha

©JNTO
 
 

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* Disclaimer:
The JNTO Newsletter is published as a complimentary service to our valued partners in the travel and convention sectors. The opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the official view of JNTO. While every sincere effort is made to ensure accuracy, readers should confirm prices and schedule information directly with the relevant organizer. All information is subject to change without notice. Neither JNTO nor any holder of copyright to the information shall be held responsible in any way whatsoever for any loss or misunderstanding, either direct or indirect, that is incurred as a result of utilizing the information.


© 2010 Japan National Tourism Organization

 

Japan Convention Bureau
Japan National Tourism Organization
Tel: 212-757-5641 ext. 21
Fax: 212-307-6754
Email: cardon@jntonyc.org